veganuary

How To Go Vegan In 2019

2019 is the year of Veganism. Charity Veganuary announced that 250,000 people tried vegan with Veganuary this year, making it the most popular campaign since the charity was launched in 2014.

Furthermore, Veganism is going mainstream, with the likes of Subway, McDonalds and Greggs all trialing vegan options, many to great success.

So here’s your guide to joining the Vegan revolution in 2019.

Learn The Reasons

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There are many reasons why people go Vegan, be it for health, the environment or to help animals and there is so much information around for the reasons, yet it can sometimes be a hard read. For example there’s evidence that millions of male chickens are killed on the day of birth as they are no use.

Understanding the industry helps maintain a Vegan lifestyle long term.

Try Animal Alternatives

Despite the myths, it’s not the case that a Vegan has to carry round a meagre salad for the day, craving out for protein and sugar. Quite the opposite. There are now numerous brands selling every type of your favourite foods in Vegan options, be they Candy sweets made without gelatine, pulled ‘pork’ made from jackfruit or non-dairy chocolate.

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We recommend signing up to a subscription of TreatKind so you can try a selection of new products every month.

It’s really important that you go Vegan at your own pace, so you can maintain it for the long term, rather than trying to make the switch overnight and ending due to frustration after a week.

Join The Conversation

Twitter is the place to hear about what’s going on in the world of Veganism. Just recently hostages such as #Veganuary and #Februdairy have trended at the top in many countries. (We’re also on Twitter)

The Vegan Society is another good source of information, helping you make more informed choices, and offering opportunities to get involved.

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What Is The Difference Between Organic & Free Range Eggs?

One of the many questions people have about farming is the eggs. There’s organic and free range. Are they the same thing? Is one better than the other? Here we take a look at the differences, based on the UK definitions.

Firstly, it should be said that Vegans don’t eat eggs at all. They are the product of animals and therefore are not consumed. Most Vegetarians, however, do eat eggs - therefore it’s important to know the difference.

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Shockingly, the UK consumes nearly 13 billion eggs a year. About 50% of these are free range, and just 2% are organic. The rest come from cages and a small few in barns.

  • Flock sizes are smaller for Organic chickens, at a maximum of 2,000 birds per sq/m vs 16,000 in free range farms.

  • Organic Chickens actually ‘range free’. There are more exit holes on the hen houses for organic chickens, meaning they can explore more often.

  • The diet of Organic chickens is non GM, whereas free range chickens can eat Genetically Modified foods.

  • Beak trimming. You’ve probably heard of the pecking order. Well that comes from chickens who fight for dominance by pecking each other. It’s a natural thing, but what’s unnatural is keeping the hens packed tightly in cages where they can’t escape. That’s why the more open nature of organic is better, and they can therefore do less or even no beak trimming. Whereas for free-range and caged hens, their beaks are mutilated.

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To summarise, for Vegans, eating eggs is always wrong. For Vegetarians, it’s important to know that there are wild differences between free-range and organic chickens, no matter what the picture on the box may lead you to believe.